Suardalan

Big Bothy Walk #29 I was jumping ahead of my original plan, in order to meet Emma. Emma had been walking the UK perimeter for the last four hundred odd days and was now up in northwest Scotland. We had ended up on the Wales Coast Path at the same time this past winter, heading … Continue reading Suardalan

A’chuil

Big Bothy Walk #26 A'chuil is the first MBA bothy reached by those on the Cape Wrath Trail; the 200 mile trail that winds its way through the rugged fringes of isolated Knoydart, on to Torridon and the edge of Assynt before the final push across the peat-hagged Parph to the Cape Wrath Lighthouse at … Continue reading A’chuil

Gleann Dubh-Lighe

Big Bothy Walk #24 Gleann Dubh-Lighe translates as glen of dark water with 'lighe' referring to water that is full, flooding, or in spate. It had been raining in the days before and the Dubh Lighe river was churning and hurling itself in a frenzy of white, fast and high along the deep, shadowed chasm … Continue reading Gleann Dubh-Lighe

Cadderlie

Big Bothy Walk #23 There was once a large orchard at Cadderlie; a vibrant, brimming garden so fantastic and beautiful it was written into both history and local lore. We have only old words and handwritten records of it now after a freak tide chased up the land during a devastating storm four hundred years … Continue reading Cadderlie

Taigh Seumus a’ Ghlinne/Duror

Big Bothy Walk #22 I now have a V-shaped scar between the index finger and thumb of my left hand, the flesh snared on a barbed wire fence as I battled the haggard path from Resourie. Mired and slowed in mud and bogs up until the view from the point of Meall Daimh where the … Continue reading Taigh Seumus a’ Ghlinne/Duror

Resourie

Big Bothy Walk #21 Stewart had dropped me off at the top of the path that would take me south out of Glenfinnan to the west side of Loch Shiel. All that overdramatic faffing around at Essan had cut my day short, I set up my tent by the bank after a few hours of … Continue reading Resourie

Essan

Big Bothy Walk #20 No other bothy manages to be both as visible and as inaccessible as Essan. Perched on the south side of Loch Eilt, the railway line that carries the trains between Fort William and Mallaig runs only 100 metres or so in front of the bothy, with the A-road carrying cars the … Continue reading Essan

Leacraithnaich

Big Bothy Walk #19 I had managed to wrench myself away from the islands for now, which was good because I somehow lost all track of time and myself on them. Their slower pace, friendliness, individuality and, well, many distilleries, means I could pretty much turn into whatever the equivalent would be of an Odyssean … Continue reading Leacraithnaich

Tomsleibhe

Big Bothy Walk #18 I had run into Jude again in Oban. He had been watching ducks (or something involving birds) on Colonsay before arriving in Oban, and was preparing to go to Mull. As was I. So we decided to go together. "Will it be a you-walk or a normal walk?" he asked on … Continue reading Tomsleibhe

Cruib Lodge

Big Bothy Walk #17 The maelstrom of Corrywreckan can be heard ten miles away. The whirlpool crashes 10 metre high waves around a towering pinnacle of basalt, protecting the northern shore of Jura. Jura. What is in a name? Often said to have its roots in Norse observing the many deer, but there is another … Continue reading Cruib Lodge